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Fort Igmándi

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Fort Igmándi
Fort Igmándi
Fort Igmándi

 

The erection of Fort Igmánd, the most recent member of the fortification system situated the farthest south, was commenced in 1871. The fortress was equipped with the widest possible forefront, thus ensuring that the number of cannons and guns facing the enemy at the same time was maximized. The north side of the closed courtyard bordered on a barrack. The lower and upper ravelins could be accessed from the courtyard through a tunnel system. According to the relevant regulations, the fortress had to be defended by one to four companies as well as 16-20 cannons.

From September 1939 to March 1941 the fortress served as quarters for fugitive Polish soldiers. After this period it was used for the purposes of a Polish military internment camp, then as a labour service barrack.

Towards the end of World War II the outer parts of the casemates functioned as air-raid shelter for the population of the neighbouring areas. Later, between 1945 and 1984 the fortress accommodated a screening camp where soldiers and citizens returning home from Western Europe had to go an identification and classification process.

Following this period the rooms and chambers of the building were used for workshops, warehouses and shelters.

Since 1996 Fort Igmánd has been hosting the Roman Stonework Collection of the Kpalka György Museum.